Make your own free website on Tripod.com
Abstracts of Wills Vol VI 1760-1766

From The New York Historical Society Collections, this 1897 volume features abstracts of wills on file in the Surrogates Office, City of New York, from 1760-1766.

Bibliographic Information: Abstracts of Wills Vol VI 1760-1766, The New York Historical Society, 1897.


Page 106.--"On the 11 day of December in the year 1761. I, JOSEPH MOTT, of Rockaway, in the town of Hempsted, Queens County, do make this my last will." My executors are to rent out all my lands and meadows, so long as my wife remains my widow, and she is to have the rents and profits until my youngest child is 10 years old, "in order to bring up my children withal." After that my wife is to have 1/2, and the other half to my two sons. "If my wife should have another son by me it is to have an equal share." After the death or marriage of my wife all houses and lands to my two sons Benjamin and Joseph, and they are to pay to my two daughters (not named) 50 each. I make my two brothers, James and John Mott, and Patrick Mott, executors.

Witnesses, Richard Mott, Anthony Rhodes, Nathan Smith. Proved, May 24, 1763.



Page 42.--In the name of God, Amen. I, JOSEPH MOTT, of Charlotte Precinct, Duchess County, being in good health. I leave to my son Joseph 10. To my wife Catharena 200 and 2 horses, a negro girl, best bed, and the farming utensils on my farm. Which said farm is situate in Lot No. 3, on Hudson river, in the Great 9 Partners, and is to extend from said river east into the woods until it contains 300 acres. And one equal half of the remainder of said lot I leave to my son Joseph and his wife during their lives, and then one-half to his son Joseph, and the other half to the rest of his children. The other half of said Lot I give to my son Samuel. And the 300 acres first mentioned, I give to my son Richard, but my wife is to have the use of the farm till my son is of age. But if she shall contract matrimony she shall deliver up the farm to my executors. If she remains a widow she is to have 1/3 of said farm. I leave to my son .Jacob all my right in a certain lot in the Last Division of Great Nine Partners, joining the land of Daniel Carpenter. One half of said lot belongs to Benjamin L(???)tr (page torn) (Lester?), and the other half to me. I make my brother, Jacob Mott, of Queens County, Long Island, and my trusty friend, Lawrence Maston (Marston?), executors. And they are to pay to my son Joseph 10 and to my wife 200, and all the rest of my estate to my four daughters, Martha , wife of James Valentine; Jane, wife of Timothy Smith; Elizabeth, wife of Samuel Smith, and Jemima, wife of John Cannon. "And I do declare this to be my one Voluntory Will without the perswasions of any parsons whatsoever." August 28, 1762.

Witnesses, Johan George Rimpp, Tobias Stoutenbergh, merchant, Catharine Stoutenbergh. Proved, February 16, 1765, before Bartholomew Crannell.



Page 205.--"I, WILLIAM MOTT, of Mamaroneck, in Westchester County, being in health. First, I do submit and freely resign myself and all that I have unto the will of the Almighty unto whose service I dedicate my life." "My Body I resign to the Earth, desiring the interment thereof to be done in a solemn and Christian anner, avoiding all the formal ceremonies and corrupt customs of the World, particularly that unnecessary, unsuitable custom of handing Strong Liquor about amongst those who come together upon such a Solemn occasion, by which act and other formalities of like nature those seasons which in a particular manner call for Humiliation and Solemn Meditation upon the awful Subject of Eternity and our own Mortality are prevented, and rather made seasons of Worldly Pomp and gratification of the sensual desires of the flesh, against which corrupt and unbecoming practices I have given my Testimony, sometimes in words, as well as constantly in practice, and do here give my last Testimony against it." After all debts and funeral expenses are paid, I leave to my well beloved wife Mary 1/2 of all my goods and the use of 1/2 of my lands during her widowhood, and no longer. The other half I leave to my children when of age, but my wife is to have the use of the whole for the education of my children (not named) until of age. I make my wife Mary and my brother-in-law, John Townsend, of Mamaroneck, executors. Dated "this 4th day of 6th month," 1762.

Codicil.--I, William Mott, having reviewed and considered my will. I leave to my wife Mary 1/2 of all my estate, to her and her heirs and assigns, and the other 1/2 to my children. I confirm my said executors, and add to them Edward Burling, of Long Reach, and his son, Edward Burling, Jr. Dated 4th day of 6th month, 1762.

Witnesses, Elizabeth Townsend, Sr., Ebenezer Haviland, Elizabeth Townsend, Jr. Proved, March 18, 1766, upon the affirmation of Elizabeth Townsend, Sr., "of the People called Quakers."



Abstracts of Wills Vol V 1754-1760

From The New York Historical Society Collections, this 1896 volume features abstracts of wills on file in the Surrogates Office, City of New York, from 1754-1760.

Bibliographic Information: Abstracts of Wills Vol V 1754-1760, The New York Historical Society, 1896.
page 18.--"I, HANNAH MOTT, widow ofHannah, wife of Daniel Stevenson, and Martha, wife of John Alyn, Jr., each 5, to be paid by my son, William Mott. I leave to my daughter, Martha Mott, the use of my slave "Bett," "And my said daughter Martha being under a discomposure of mind, if the said negro will not be governed and directed by my executors, they shall sell her and buy another for her use during her disorder of mind." I also leave to her the use of my side saddle, and two beds and all my woolen and linnen cloth, and my wearing apparell of all sorts, and the interest on 100. If my daughter Martha should become of sound mind she is to have the negro and other for her own. If my executors see fit to sell the negro woman and buy another in her place, if the price she sells for is not sufficient they may make it up out of the 100. If she does not recover her mind, and dies, then the same shall go to my son William. "As to the residue of my estate, it being chiefly in my son William's hands, I bequeath it to him, and he is to pay the legacies." Mentions "my son William's children" [not named]. I make my son William, and my cousin, Adam Mott, of Cow Neck, and my friend, Nathaniel Pearsall, of Cow Neck, executors.

Witnesses, Samuel Willis, John Morrell, Luke Cummins, school master. Proved, April 25, 1760, before Thomas Braine, Surrogate.


Page 47.--"The last will and testament of RICHBELL MOTT, of Hempstead, in Queens County, made this 28 of April, 1758." My executors are to sell 100 acres of land, beginning at the west end of the farm I now live on, and so running across the said farm and extending so far eastward as to make 100 acres, And they are also to sell so much personal property as will make 100, the sales to be made at public auction. Out of the money my just debts and funeral charges are to be paid, and the rest of the money and my movable estate I leave to my wife Deborah, and also the use of the remainder of my farm, "as well to bring up my children in a decent manner, as in lieu of her dower," until my daughter Mgt. is 18. I then leave to my daughter Margaret 1/2 of the farm and buildings, and my wife is to have the use of the other half until my daughter Phebe is of age, and then I leave to my daughter Phebe the other half of the farm and buildings. If both my daughters die, then I leave my estate to my brothers, Edmond and John Mott. I make my wife Deborah and my brother, John Mott, executors.

Witnesses, Pegga Kissam, Elizabeth Dodge, Cornell Sands. Proved, June 9, 1758.



Page 226.--I, GERSHOM MOTT, of New Hempstead, in Orange County, being sick. I leave to my eldest son, Solomon Mott, my gun for his birth right, being my heir at law, and having had his portion before. I leave to my son Gershom 5s., and to my children, Molly Lott, Elizabeth Clark, Charles Mott, 5 shillings each, they all having had their portions before. I leave to my grand son, Gershom Lott, son of Peter and Molly Lott, 5 shillings when he is 21. I leave to my wife Ruth 1/3 of all movables, household goods, and farming utensils, "also the time that Catharine Delornbery is bound to me," and also my Bible, so long as she lives, and then to my son Benjamin. I also leave to my wife 6 yearly. I leave to my son Charles all the money that Absalom Little, of Lewistown, in Pennsylvania, is indebted to me. I leave to my son Benjamin 20, and to my wife Ruth 14. I leave to my son Benjamin all my housing and lands and rights of land in Orange County, and 1/2 of the saw mill and all the rest of my estate, real and personal, and I make him and Jacob Halstead executors.

Dated August 7, 1758. Witnesses, Joseph Seaman, Caleb Seaman, Gershom Rose. Proved, March 2, 1759.

[NOTE.--Gershom Mott was one of the Colony from Hempstead, L. I., who purchased the north half of the Kakiat Patent, in what is now Rockland County, N. Y., in 1717. Some of his descendants were living there in recent years.--W. S. P.]



Abstracts of Wills Vol IV 1744-1753

From The New York Historical Society Collections, this 1895 volume features abstracts of wills on file in the Surrogates Office, City of New York, from 1744 to 1753.

Bibliographic Information: Abstracts of Wills Vol IV 1744-1753, The New York Historical Society, 1895.



Page 320.--I, BENJAMIN MOTT, of Oyster Bay, in Queens County, being sick. I leave to my cousin (nephew), Samuel Mott, son of my brother, Charles Mott, deceased, 200, and to his brother, Silvanus Mott, 50. I leave to the four children of my brother, Adam Mott, viz., Daniel, Jonathan, Jacob, and Marianah, 50. I leave to my cousin (nephew), Joseph Mott, son of my brother, Charles Mott, 8 shillings. My executors are to sell all my lands in Orange County, and divide the money between my brother, Adam Mott, and my cousins Samuel and Silvanus. I leave to Benjamin Mott, son of my brother, John Mott, all my land at Cape Fear, in North Carolina. I leave to Jacob Mott, son of my brother, Adam Mott, all my lands in Hempstead. To my brother Adam, all my wearing apparell. If the land I sold to Thomas Dodge, in Orange County, should be lost, my executors are to make it good. I leave to my cousin, Joseph Starkins, my broad axe and gun, and to my cousin (nephew), Jacob Mott, son of my brother Adam, a bed. I make my cousins, Samuel and Jacob Mott, and Sylvanus Townsend, executors.

Dated September 20, 1748. Witnesses, William Lawrence, Samuel Pearsall, Thomas Pearsall. Proved, September 29, 1748.


Page 230.--"The Last will and Testament of EDMOND MOTT, of Hempstead, in Queens County, the 4th day of the 6th month, commonly called August, 1741." I direct that all my personal estate be exposed to publick sale or vendue, and out of the proceeds all debts and funeral expenses to be paid, "particularly that debt of mine to the Loan officers, for which my land stands security." I leave to my wife Catharine, 200, and to my daughter Margaret, 170, when she is 10 years old. My wife is to have the use of my estate and the personal property to bring up the children. For the better enabling of my wife to bring up my children in a decent manner, I give her the sole use of all my farm till my son Richbell is of age, but if she enters into wedlock she is to remove off of said farm. I leave to my son, Richbell Mott, when he is of age, 1/2 of my plantation or farm, with all the buildings and improvements. I leave 1/4 of the farm to my son Edmond, and 1/4 to my son John, when they are of age. My executors may sell the farm if it is for the interest of the children. I make my wife Catharine, and my esteemed friends and kinsmen, Joseph Mott and William Mott, both of Hempstead, executors.

Witnesses, John Willis, Elizabeth Barnes, William Burch. Proved before Adam Laurence, Esq., June 13, 1744.





NEXT-MORE MOTT WILLS

BACK TO MOTT FAMILY INDEX PAGE